The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women - U.S. Department of State Entrepreneurship Program leverages the expertise of the public and private sectors to form a partnership that encourages inclusive economic growth in the Middle East and Northern Africa.

This collaboration between the Department of State and Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women, in coordination with Harvard Kennedy School, will bring approximately 30 women entrepreneurs engaged in the business, media and nonprofit sectors from the Middle East and Northern Africa to the U.S. for a two-week program focused on entrepreneurship, leadership training, mentoring, and networking.

The program directly supports the U.S. goals of advancing women’s efforts to become financially independent through entrepreneurship and utilize their economic strength to improve their communities. Promoting entrepreneurship globally is a vital element of the Obama Administration’s foreign economic and development policy – a policy that fosters economic progress, creates jobs, promotes civil society, and provides new economic opportunities for U.S. business and investors.

The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women – U.S. Department of State Entrepreneurship Program features professional networking and mentoring opportunities with Goldman Sachs employees in New York City; Washington, D.C.-based visits with local business incubators, along with discussions with leading policy makers; and a four-day training program at Harvard Kennedy School, supported through a grant from Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women.

What are the Benefits?
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Economic Empowerment Evidence

Evidence from a range of countries shows that increasing the share of household income controlled by women, either through their own earnings or cash transfers, changes spending in ways that benefit children.

Source: The World Bank, 2012, World Development Report: Gender Equality and Development

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Fortune 500 Analysis

An analysis of Fortune 500 companies found that those with the greatest representation of women in management positions delivered a total return to shareholders that was 34 per cent higher than for companies with the lowest representation.

Source: Catalyst, 2004, “The Bottom Line: Connecting Corporate Performance and Gender Diversity,” p. 8

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